Food Chains and Food Webs

 

Students can investigate food chains by looking closer at trees on their school grounds. They should look for such things as damage to leaves made by feeding insects, galls and exit-holes left in the bark by insect borers. Galls are aberrant plant tissues caused mostly by certain egg-laying mites and insects. Gall tissue provides food and shelter for the developing mite or insect. As students approach a tree, watch for birds and small mammals that may be feeding, or look for droppings and tracks of animals that may have visited the tree recently. Listed below are some of the more common food chain relationships that students can observe, organized by host tree.

This site will take you to pictures and text provided by the following institutions. We thank:

  • University of Michigan's Museum of Zoology's Animal Diversity Web for fact sheets on vertebrate animals
  • University of Georgia Warnell School of Forest Resources' Forest Pests of North America for insects and diseases
  • Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources Dendrology at Virginia Tech website for tree fact sheets.


    Ashes
    Basswood or linden

    Beech

    Birches
    Black Locust
    Black Tupelo
    Cherries
    Chestnut
    Dogwoods
    Eastern redcedar
    Elms
    Hackberry
    Hemlock
    Hickories and Pecans
    Hollies
    Hornbeam
    Maples
    Mulberries
    Oaks
    Persimmon
    Pines
    Sassafras and spicebush
    Sumacs
    Sweetgum

    Sycamores
    Tulip Tree (Yellow-poplar)
    Walnuts
    Waxmyrtles and Bayberries
    Willows

     

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